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Showing posts from June, 2015

New law requires cameras in special education classrooms - TheAutismWorld.Com

New law requires cameras in special education classrooms - TheAutismWorld.Com



A new bill was passed Friday that would require school districts
across the State of Texas to install cameras inside Special Education
classes.




“Parents with normal children, they worry about their kids going to
school. Parents who have their special angels it’s more of a worry,”
said Velma Torres a Parent of a special needs child.




Velma Torres is one of many special needs parents that are happy that
video cameras will be placed in the special needs classroom. So is
Veronica Contreras. Contreras says her son has multiple disabilities and
he can’t speak for himself.




“There was an incident when he came home with a black eye and nobody
could tell me what happened. At least this way we could go back and look
what happened, to see how to prevent it from happening again,” said
Veronica Contreras.




The cameras would have to cover all areas of the classroom except for
the bathroom or any place where a stud…

The empty rhetoric of increasing the rigor of Missouri teachers : News

The empty rhetoric of increasing the rigor of Missouri teachers : News



Every teacher education program in Missouri has the goal of preparing
the most qualified educators for the classroom. We take pride in
producing candidates who are able to leverage their content knowledge
into powerful and relevant classroom experiences for schoolchildren.



Yet,
the amount and kind of content knowledge needed to be an effective
educator has always been a contentious issue. On June 16, the Missouri
State Board of Education decided to maintain the cut scores for the
assessments in the 55 content areas where teachers are licensed, giving
the illusion that the state was steadfast in its commitment to increase
the “rigor” of teacher candidates entering the profession.



With
high fail rates, it becomes easy to arrive at one or both of these
conclusions: The assessments are more rigorous, so of course, the pass
rates will drop; or teacher education programs must not be doing their
job in prepar…

Eight South Carolina Lawmakers Explain Why They Are Opposed To Removing The Confederate Flag | ThinkProgress

Eight South Carolina Lawmakers Explain Why They Are Opposed To Removing The Confederate Flag | ThinkProgress





Are we surprised that they are all Republicans?




The racially motivated shooting that killed nine in Charleston last
week has sparked a national debate about the presence of the Confederate
flag, which symbolizes racism and hatred to many, at the Capitol
grounds. On Monday, Republican Gov. Nikki Haley called for the removal
of the flag. She said it was time for the flag to be taken down and put
in a museum, and that South Carolinians were welcome to display it on
their private property.



Only a simple majority vote is needed to
remove the flag, contrary to what many media outlets have reported. On
Tuesday, Charleston newspaper The Post & Courier asked lawmakers
what they think about the Confederate flag. Many said they would vote to
remove it and some wouldn’t answer or were undecided, but eight House
representatives said they were sure they would vote no. Here’s …

Teacher: Trash Can Meant To Calm Boy With Autism - Disability Scoop

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Teacher: Trash Can Meant To Calm Boy With Autism - Disability Scoop



A special education teacher in Georgia accused of putting a
second-grader with autism in a trash can, comparing his behavior to
Oscar the Grouch on “Sesame Street,” says she was trying to calm the
child, not hurt him.


Mary
Katherine Pursley demonstrates how she says she held a student over a
trash can. The veteran Cobb County special education teacher is accused
of putting a second-grader with autism in a trash can and calling him
Oscar the Grouch. She went before a tribunal at the school system
headquarters Monday. (Bob Andres/Atlanta Journal-Constitution/TNS) Mary Katherine Pursley, a teacher at Mt. Bethel Elementary, in
Marietta, Ga., said at a tribunal hearing Monday at the Cobb County
School District office that the child was screaming and upset at an
after-school program and she was attempting to get him to stop by
holding him over a trash can to “shake out the grouchy.”


“My intention was not to put hi…

Greene Valley poised to pay $350,000 to settle suit in alleged battery of autistic boy

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Greene Valley poised to pay $350,000 to settle suit in alleged battery of autistic boy



A settlement of $350,000 has been proposed in a federal lawsuit
alleging that an autistic boy who cannot speak was repeatedly assaulted
by a teacher at the Greene Valley State School for the Severely
Disabled.



The lawsuit, filed by the boy's father, alleges teacher
Janet Carrie Williams hit and slapped the boy and called him names. It
alleges the boy's rights were repeatedly violated and he suffered
"bodily harm and emotional distress." The defendants stated, in the
settlement agreement, that they deny those allegations.



The
four-page tentative agreement was filed this week but must still be
signed and accepted by a judge. If approved, it would resolve the civil
lawsuit against the school, the teacher, Greene Valley director Peggy
Robinson, the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
and the Missouri Board of Education. Criminal charges are still pendi…

Enhanced school background checks in Missouri speed results, flags new arrests

Struggles seen on new Missouri educator certification exams | State News | columbiamissourian.com

Struggles seen on new Missouri educator certification exams | State News | columbiamissourian.com




KANSAS
CITY, Missouri — Missouri education officials are proposing changes
after test-takers struggled on new certification exams, particularly
those for aspiring math and science teachers.

The
proposed changes, which will be discussed Tuesday at a Missouri Board
of Education meeting, include giving test-takers more time and fewer
questions to answer on some of the exams. Fifty-five content tests
measure readiness to be everything from classroom teachers to
superintendents. On six of them, fewer than half of test-takers passed,
newly released data shows.

Issues
arose after the state switched certification exams in September.
Instead of taking a test known as Praxis II, students now must fare well
on a more rigorous assessment called the Missouri Content Assessment.
Through April 12, more than 7,100 of the tests were taken.

Paul Katnik, an assistant
commissioner for the Missouri …

15 Reasons Why Its Hard To Get Along With Special Needs Parents

15 Reasons Why Its Hard To Get Along With Special Needs Parents





Have you ever wondered why parents of kids with special needs always seem to be so cranky?




Or why we tend to make really inappropriate remarks so often?




Or why other parents of kids with special needs laugh at those inappropriate remarks like it’s an inside joke?


The Life We LiveSpecial needs parenting is a lifestyle.  For many of us, it is not
the lifestyle we chose.  And even if we did choose to become a special
needs family through adoption, there are still plenty of reasons to be
cranky – and then joke about it later.




Here are 15 possible reasons to explain the mysterious behaviors of some special needs parents.




1. Already changed the sheets twice before 7am and cleaned excrement from some very creative and almost-inaccessible places.




2. Spouse drank the last cup of coffee in the house.
 The rest of the coffee was dumped on the kitchen floor and eaten by an
ecstatic child yesterday before it could be fully cle…

Study: Adults with autism often have little opportunity

Study: Adults with autism often have little opportunity



Roughly one in 10 young adults on the autism spectrum apparently has
nothing to do all day, and many more have very limited opportunities,
according to a new study.



They aren't in school, they aren't working and they aren't receiving any job training or government-funded services, said Paul Shattuck, an associate professor at the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute at Drexel University in Philadelphia, who helped lead a new study on young adults with autism.

"Something is pretty broken," Shattuck said.



For
years, interest in autism has been growing along with autism rates. The
condition now affects one child in 68. Most of the emphasis, though,
has been on young children on the autism spectrum.

"We've
been so focused on that end of the lifespan that it's almost as if we
forgot that these children were going to become adults and now we're at
this crisis point in the system," said Anne Roux…

Who Are We Celebrating At Graduation?

I wrote this in May 2009.  It is still relevant today.
Celebration for all graduates I was a part of three life changing events this week.  The first was my son 16-year-old son dropping out of Lee's Summit High School.  The emotional and psychological damage of going to school wasn't worth the little educational benefit that he was receiving. The second was my twin daughter’s graduating from Lee's Summit High School.  They were average students that had to work very hard to achieve their success.  That was something that we weren't allowed to celebrate at their graduation. The only students that were recognized were those in the top ten percent. The third was the graduation of my nephew from Missouri University of Science and Technology.  He graduated Summa Cum Laude with a bachelor's degree in electrical engineering and a bachelor's degree in computer engineering.  He was a member of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi.  He is also a graduate of Lee&#…

Unusual Fears and Phobias in Children with Autism - West Palm Beach Autism & Education | Examiner.com

Unusual Fears and Phobias in Children with Autism - West Palm Beach Autism & Education | Examiner.com





Anxiety Disorders are a frequent co-occurring (comorbid) problem for children and youth with ASD.
Although prevalence rates vary from 11% to 84%, most studies indicate
that approximately one-half of children with ASD meet criteria for at
least one anxiety disorder. Of all types of anxiety disorders, specific
phobia is the most common, with prevalence estimates ranging from 31% to
64%. In contrast, estimates of phobias in children in the general population range from 5% to 18%.




Unusual fears have long been recognized as a feature of autism.
In fact, 70 years ago, Leo Kanner wrote in his initial account of
autism that “loud noises and moving objects” are “reacted to with
horror” and things like “tricycles, swings, elevators, vacuum cleaners,
running water, gas burners, mechanical toys, egg beaters, even the wind
could on occasions bring about a major panic.” We now know tha…

Survey Finds Most With Special Needs 'Striving To Work' - Disability Scoop

Survey Finds Most With Special Needs 'Striving To Work' - Disability Scoop





A new, national survey finds that the majority of people with disabilities want to be employed, but they often encounter barriers to work.


Overall, nearly 43 percent of individuals surveyed said they were
currently working. Another 25 percent said they’d been previously
employed and a handful of people said they hadn’t worked but were
looking for a job.


Collectively, those behind the research said the figures show that
nearly 69 percent of those with disabilities are “striving to work.”


The findings come from a telephone poll of more than 3,000 adults
with disabilities across the country conducted by the University of New
Hampshire for the Kessler Foundation, a New Jersey-based nonprofit that
focuses on neurological disabilities.


For the survey, pollsters random-dialed over 117,000 landline and
cellphone numbers across the country between October 2014 and April 2015
to reach households with at …

Paper Trails: Your Word Against Theirs – Not a Good Position! | The Wrightslaw Way

Paper Trails: Your Word Against Theirs – Not a Good Position! | The Wrightslaw Way



This is a lesson I learned the hard way.  Never, I repeat, never call anyone.  Email them.  Phone calls never exist and what you were told was never said.  Write a letter of understanding after every meeting.  Their notes will be abbreviated and they never tell the truth later.  You must never trust anyone to be honest or to have your child's best interest at heart.  You are the only one that will advocate for your child.  If you don't fight for them no one else will.  The school district will never give your child the services that they are entitled to unless you educate yourself and fight for them.

ADHD symptoms common and problematic in children with autism - West Palm Beach Autism & Education | Examiner.com

ADHD symptoms common and problematic in children with autism - West Palm Beach Autism & Education | Examiner.com



One of the most frequently discussed issues related to autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is the co-occurrence (comorbidity) of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Comorbidity refers to the presence of more than one diagnosis occurring
in an individual at the same time. Although there continues to a debate
about ADHD comorbidity in ASD, research, practice and theoretical
models suggest that comorbidity between these disorders is relevant and
occurs frequently. Moreover, a significant change in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5;
APA, 2013) is the removal of the DSM-IV-TR (APA, 2000) hierarchical
rules prohibiting the concurrent diagnosis of ASD and ADHD. When the
criteria for both ASD and ADHD are met, both may be diagnosed.




A study published in the journal Pediatrics
evaluated the frequency of co-occurring …

“Voices of Autism” Anthology Shares Real-Life Accounts of 40 Patients and Caregivers - Autism - MedHelp

“Voices of Autism” Anthology Shares Real-Life Accounts of 40 Patients and Caregivers - Autism - MedHelp



-- [Sherri Tucker, LOCAL AUTHOR, PUBLISHES STORY IN ANTHOLOGY]--







[Lee’s Summit-May 9, 2008] – Autism is the fastest growing
developmental disability in the U.S.  As more is learned about the
disorder, more resources for patients and caregivers are being
developed.  1 in 121 children in Missouri are diagnosed with autism. One
of these resources is a new anthology, Voices of Autism: The Healing
Companion: Stories for Courage, Comfort and Strength, which chronicles
the stories of more than 40 families living with autism including
[Sherri Tucker, Lee’s Summit, MO].







Each contributor shares a poignant, heartfelt and often inspiring
true account of experiences with autism spectrum disorders, from the
frustration of an autistic teenager unable to speak, yet knowing he is
being left out of conversations in “The Price of Talk,” to the sadness
and fear of a mother as her son becomes a…

Oklahoma City district experiencing turnover in principals - Houston Chronicle

Oklahoma City district experiencing turnover in principals - Houston Chronicle



OKLAHOMA
CITY (AP) — Around half of the principals at the 11 high schools in the
Oklahoma City district are retiring, resigning or taking another job
with the district, and the leader of a teacher union said he hasn't seen
that many vacancies at one time during his more than decade-long
tenure.

"I
think they're seeing that there are too many challenges in this
district and not the support that they think they need to address those
challenges," said Ed Allen, president of the union that represents the district's 2,700 teachers.

The
turnover follows an investigation by the U.S. Department of Education
for possible civil rights violations regarding disciplinary actions
against students, The Oklahoman (http://bit.ly/1KGHcvs ) reported. Superintendent Rob Neu recently released a report that showed the district suspends minority students at a much higher rate than their white peer…

They Don't Want To Be Held Accountable

Our school district is once again spreading false information to its citizens in hopes that you will contact your legislators and have them vote no on a bill that is essential to kids with special needs.  Anyone that has a child with special needs knows that they need to pass this bill.  Lee's Summit has consistently left our children behind and we need legislation to ensure that does not continue. 

They are also listing who voted on the bill so that you will think that they are not voting in the right way.  You need to congratulate these legislators for voting for our children and standing up to the bullying of the school district.

Shame on the House for not passing this bill.

Here is part of the mass email.