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Showing posts from March, 2013

Teacher Stands In Place of The Parent When The Child Is Sent To The Public Schools

Teachers Stands In Place OF The Parent When The Child Is Sent To The Public Schools
http://plms.leesummit.k12.mo.us/handbook/handbook07.pdf

POLICIES CONCERNING ORDER AND DISCIPLINE

The law provides teachers with considerable authority over the control and education of the child, once the parent sends his child to the public schools. The authority of the teacher is given by law and is not delegated by the parent. Authority is granted to the teacher by the state as an essential part of teacher responsibility. The teacher stands in place of the parent when the child is under the teacherʼs supervision and care.

Read more: http://www.city-data.com/forum/kansas-city/1761615-lees-summit-school-district-really-good-2.html#ixzz2P8FJQ7bw

www.childrenseducationalliance-mo.org/policy-perspectives

www.childrenseducationalliance-mo.org/policy-perspectives


Policy Perspectives with the Children’s Education Alliance of Missouri is an education reform podcast that will feature topics central to the need for education reform in Missouri. It will feature experts on accountability and transparency, teacher quality, and parental choice. To suggest topics or guests for our podcast please send us suggestions on FaceBook or tweet us at @ceamofficial. 8. Policy Perspectives (3/26/2013): Three things every parent of a special learner should know before attending an IEP meeting.
Click HERE to listen…Legal Services of Eastern Missouri attorney Pat Mobley who works with LSEM’s Children’s Legal Alliance talks about his work with special needs learners and the IEP process with CEAM’s Peter Franzen and Lisa Clancy. 7.Policy Perspectives (3/13/2013): Legislative Update
Click HERE to listen…Listen as CEAM State Policy Director Kate Casas discusses A-F school report card ratings and other education reform…

[UPDATED] Is Ohio Department of Education scrubbing their attendance manuals?

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[UPDATED] Is Ohio Department of Education scrubbing their attendance manuals?


[UPDATED] Is Ohio Department of Education scrubbing their attendance manuals?byonAugust 24, 2012 · 9 Comments While the Ohio Auditor is investigating attendance practices in districts across the state, the Ohio Department of Education (also a target of the investigation) continues to deny any culpability for the entire affair.  Instead, ODE spokesperson John Charlton has repeatedly defended the department’s actions as top notch and crystal clear. From StateImpact Ohio: Charlton says there should be no confusion about how to enter absentee data. “The Ohio Revised Code clearly defines what a withdrawn student is,” he says. “I think if superintendents and school employees follow the revised code they’ll have no problem answering the questions and entering the data properly into our system.” From the Toledo Blade: John Charlton, an education department spokesman, strongly disputed that the department hadn’t provide…

Ohio Department of Education official at center of attendance scandal resigns

Ohio Department of Education official at center of attendance scandal resigns


Ohio Department of Education official at center of attendance scandal resignsbyonAugust 27, 2012 · 8 Comments The man who has been overseeing the Division of Accountability for the Ohio Department of Education announced his resignation less than two weeks after the state agency found itself under suspicion of wrongdoing in the investigation into irregularities in student attendance reporting. William Zelei, Associate Superintendent of Accountability and Quality Schools, submitted his letter of resignation on August 6, only two days after the State Superintendent stepped down, and only 11 days after the State Auditor revealed that ODE was also under investigation for questionable activities regarding School District Accountability, especially regarding the department’s role in the oversight of district attendance reporting.  Zelei has been on the job for less than a year, starting as Associate Superintendent…

How autism can cost families millions- MSN Money

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How autism can cost families millions- MSN Money


How autism can cost families millions As the rate of reported cases rises, the expense of providing care -- sometimes for a lifetime -- is becoming staggering. By Jonathan Berr Mon 8:58 AM Share1.1k Share 146 Lost amid the recent coverage about the frightening rise in reported cases of autism is any discussion of the costs to families -- which can be staggering.

According to data from the Autism Society, the annual cost to society from the illness is $137 billion, greater than the state budget of California and more than twice the market capitalization of General Motors (GM -0.86%), North America's largest automaker.

No less overwhelming is the cost to individuals and families caring for a person with autism. The Autism Society cites estimates of $3.2 million for the lifetime costs of such care. Behavioral therapies for children can cost $40,000 to $50,000 per year. Caring for an adult with autism in a supported residential setting can cos…

Teachers Should Never Bully Their Students! - The Autism Site

District refutes looting allegations - Gate House

District refutes looting allegations - Gate House


An allegation that a former school board action "looted" $1 million from the teacher's insurance fund came up during a discussion of Camdenton's salary schedule. During the public comment portion of a Camdenton Board of Education meeting on Wednesday, teachers spoke on behalf of veteran teachers who felt their wages aren't competitive. One of those teachers, Camdenton football coach Jeff Shore, told school board members that he felt it was a “situation where the teachers feel like a million dollars was taken out of that account and then in turn their insurance goes up. At best it creates a distrust among the teachers and the board." Shore is the husband of Stacy Shore, who has used the Lake Watch Dog display name in the past. The anonymous Lake Watchdog website is where the allegation of the "looting" of $1 million from the teachers’ insurance fund surfaced. Shore said that although teachers questioned t…

Autistic Boy Injured During Body Sock Incident

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Jeff Grisamore Not: Autistic Boy Injured During Body Sock Incident


Columbus, OH – An autistic boy was injured after teachers at his Ohio school used a restraint device known as a body sock on him. Naqis Cochran, 10, was placed in the device without permission, according to the family. The body sock was allegedly used on the autistic boy because he would not stop laughing during class. Naqis Cochran is a student at the South Mifflin Elementary School. The Teacher supposedly felt that spending some time in the body sock would help calm Cochran down. The restraint device is made of a stretchy purple Lycra material. The boy told his mother that he remembers the teacher helping him step into the body sock and having his arms, legs, and head zipped inside. The next thing the Ohio autistic boy remembers is falling on his face and having his tooth knocked out. Naqis reportedly underwent two emergency root canals, but is doing fine now. The South Mifflin Elementary School teacher reportedly noted …

Clearwater teacher arrested, accused of abusing two special needs students | Tampa Bay Times

Clearwater teacher arrested, accused of abusing two special needs students | Tampa Bay Times


LEARWATER — A Skycrest Elementary School teacher was arrested Thursday on charges that she abused two special needs students at the school over a period of at least two months, Clearwater police said. Melanie Jo Fox, 44, of Clearwater is accused of pulling a 6-year-old girl's hair, kicking her, hitting her with a book and binding her hands with duct tape. Police say she also pushed down an 8-year-old boy and bound his hands with a rubber band. RELATED NEWS/ARCHIVEMother: Son said Clearwater teacher charged with abuse was a bully
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Congress Rewrites IDEA Funding Rule - Disability Scoop

Jeff Grisamore Not: Congress Rewrites IDEA Funding Rule - Disability Scoop


A small change tucked inside a government spending bill this month may have big implications for special education. Lawmakers included language clarifying the penalties that states may face if they fail to adequately fund education programs for students with disabilities. The issue has become significant in recent years as states struggled financially in the recession and some sought to cut education spending. Under federal law, special education funding must be maintained or increased from one year to the next. If states fail to meet what’s known as “maintenance of effort” without obtaining a waiver from the U.S. Department of Education, they can lose out on future federal dollars. At least two states — South Carolina and Kansas — got into trouble in recent years for slashing their special education budgets without federal approval. As a result, they faced permanent reductions in their allocations from the Departm…